Toyota Australia plans rollout of three EVs by 2026

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Image credit: Toyota

Toyota Australia has revealed its plans to launch at least three EVs in three years, starting with the bZ4X SUV late this year. 

In a press release on Tuesday, the company said electrified vehicles – including hybrid-electric and other technologies – would account for more than half its sales in 2025.

With this announcement, Toyota highlighted its commitment to the product by unveiling a $20 million investment by dealers in charging stations that will assist in the sale and maintenance of customer EVs.

Toyota also shared that the installation of the 232-site first phase of the dealership charging network is currently underway and will be finished well in advance of the bZ4X’s arrival.

The latest announcements, according to Toyota Australia Vice President Sales, Marketing & Franchise Operations Sean Hanley, showed the company’s commitment to being a part of the answer in addressing climate change.

“Toyota is committed to bringing electric vehicles to Australia,” Mr Hanley said. 

Mr Hanley also explained Toyota Australia would gradually introduce additional EVs as well as other electric vehicles to continue providing customers with practical and affordable ways to reduce emissions.

“We know they will play an ever-increasing role in helping us – and our customers – get to net-zero carbon emissions,” he said.

The Toyota Australia executive also revealed that by 2030, the company globally planned to release 30 new EVs and lift EV sales to 3.5 million a year, investing 8 trillion yen (A$87 billion) in the shift to zero-carbon vehicles over that period.

Furthermore, as more EVs become available, Mr Hanley said Toyota will continue to assess them for the Australian market, including one based on the bZ Compact SUV Concept unveiled in November.

“Whether the technology is battery-electric, hybrid, fuel-cell, or some yet-to-be-discovered technology, Toyota is committed to making every effort to offer better mobility solutions for the people of Australia and the world,” Hanley noted.